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Literature

Current Affairs, Literature, Music

Worry World

    Like the weather, the gloomy words of literature threaten to upend.  I’ve been reading Christopher Isherwood’s A Meeting by the River; last night I got to the part where one of the characters commits a heinous act.  I was so mad at him I almost threw the book across the room. I tossed…

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Gay, Literature, Theater

An Understanding of Our Nature

  “I wanted to sound an alarm.  But nothing had happened.” Alfieri, A View from the Bridge by Arthur Miller. In the current revival of A View from the Bridge, the alarms ring throughout.  The play’s big Greek epiphany centers on a matter of trust: Eddie Carbone, the dockworker, commits a betrayal so huge that…

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Criticals, Dance, Literature

The Strange Ways of Love

Published Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine Before Decreation, the new William Forsythe work that appeared this fall at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Harvey Gilman Opera House, there was Anne Carson’s Decreation, the title of a book and essay.  The word doesn’t appear in Webster’s, but Carson defines it as “… an undoing of the creature…

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Literature, Theater

Welcome Home Joe Turner

    He’ll set his foot down on the road and the wind in the trees be talking to him and everywhere he step on the road, that road’ll give back your name and something will pull him right up to your doorstep…but maybe he ain’t supposed to come back. Bynum, Joe Turner’s Come and…

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Literature, Theater, Writing

O’Neill’s Hard Knocks

Passion. Desire. The ad copy for the current production of Desire Under the Elms is the kind of sexy teaser producers hope will put bodies in seats. No way would they tout the especial skills of Eugene O’Neill, an American playwright for the ages. But it’s his story up there, and while it’s by no…

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Literature, Theater

See Jane Run

The clock is ticking in 33 Variations, the gentle, thoughtful play starring Jane Fonda at Broadway’s Eugene O’Neill Theater. Playwright Moisés Kaufman explores the dual dilapidations of two characters who straddle past and present, fiction and history: musicologist Katherine Brandt (Fonda) and Ludwig Van Beethoven (Zach Grenier) both find themselves rushing to complete works (her…

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