Culture. Entertainment. Obits. And a little bit of everything else... "the only way to be quiet is to be quick, so I scare you clumsily, or surprise you with a stab." -Frank O'Hara
Reviews
Twilight world from a distance, and up close

Twilight world from a distance, and up close

Alvin Baltrop took the long view.  I relish his head-spinning panoramas of places that no longer exist; Baltrop’s camera captured the looming gilders inside abandoned hangars and the wide expanses of wooden piers along the Hudson in the West Village, ones that hadn’t seen a ship’s arrival in many a moon. But look closely, and...
At the Whitney and Artists Space, Art by Boys Who Like Boys

At the Whitney and Artists Space, Art by Boys Who Like Boys

Glenn Ligon, Malcolm X     Like Stonewall, the art revolution of the 1980s was a coming out as explosive as the times required.  Many of the artists who broke out were gay: Mapplethorpe, David Wojnarowicz, Peter Hujur, Catherine Opie and Keith Haring marched into our consciousness with forceful works that expressed an era’s glittery...
Short Cuts: Burlesque

Short Cuts: Burlesque

Burlesque (Steven Antin, director and writer).  Disparities (an aspiring showgirl plot whose high suspense turns on air rights!) and derivatives abound in a movie geared to capitalize on the blockbuster glow of a trend spurred by Chicago, and killed by its cousin, Nine.  Burlesque gleefully rips these films off while scavenging every other small-town-girl-searches-for-big-city-fame trope...
Spiderman: Turn on the Lights

Spiderman: Turn on the Lights

The theater is schizophrenic, I mused after a recent matinee of Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark.  Only a month before I’d seen Daniel Sullivan’s exemplary revival of The Merchant of Venice—it goes without saying that the shows were as different as night and day, but sometimes such dichotic experience makes us realize the range of...
Murdering Myths

Murdering Myths

Choose your Hornet… Superheroes are not clowns.  They don’t do pratfalls, lack technological savvy, or otherwise behave like assholes.  It took a franchise like Christopher Nolan’s to usher in a new era of the comic-book-hero-made-flesh, and to give guys like us (who lapped up the TV serial-versions) grown-up editions compelling enough to rival, and surpass,...
Winter Storms on the Great White Way

Winter Storms on the Great White Way

Published in Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine, Winter 2011 2010 ends as the country strives to dig itself out of snowstorms that clobbered both the Eastern and Western regions of our nation.  The weather feels an apt metaphor for a multiplicity of woes beyond airport delays and unplowed streets—think, for instance, of the snow job visited...
Swan Lake's Great Escape

Swan Lake’s Great Escape

Published Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine Winter 2011 After a bravura Broadway run in 1998, Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake returns to New York’s City Center this fall.  Amazing how little things have changed since this revisionist take on Petipa’s classic ushered in a new era of dance theater.   Then as now, our political times were in...
A Sensual World

A Sensual World

Published in Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine Winter 2011 Watching the late Pina Bausch’s torrential Vollmond made me marvel at the theater’s ability to mirror life.  The show, part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival, arrived in New York at the end of what could accurately be described as The Week of the Monsoon. ...

Under Moneyed Clouds An Artist Unfurls

Published Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine Fall 2010 The gods of Wall Street beamed from halcyon skies during the last performance of Paul-André Fortier’s mesmerizing Solo: 30X30.  It was another matter on the ground, as it took more than the charms of an agile Canadian to reach those overachievers who plowed past Fortier’s temporary domain at...

Short Cuts: On Screens Big and Small June 2010

I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale (Richard Shepard, Director, HBO).  His was one of the great cinema faces of all time.  His eyes were key though, registering menace and melancholy, while hinting at unfathomable depths.  All was anchored to a towering, unsung talent: in this documentary Cazale’s family, colleagues and fans–some of whom...
Traffic Patterns

Traffic Patterns

Published Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine Summer 2010 In the late Eric Rohmer’s Love in the Afternoon, the film’s hero, Frederic, rhapsodizes about the city: “I love the city.  The suburbs and the provinces depress me.  Despite the crush and the noise, I never tire of plunging into the crowd; I love the crowd as I...
In a Mellow Tone

In a Mellow Tone

Published Attitude: The Dancer’s Magazine Winter 2010 It’s rare that one art form forces you to take the measure of another, but such was the case during the February engagement of the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company at the Joyce Theater.  It was a question of jazz: Lubovitch presented an evening of pieces set to works...
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